Too much truth will make some people madder than too little #NapoleonHill

Schoolchildren sometimes play a game called “Honesty.” The rules are simple: For a designated period of time, the participants must tell the truth regardless of the subject. They then ask each other leading questions such as, “Do you like my hair?” “Do you think Lindsay is cute?” Inevitably someone gets angry when he or she discovers that these friends had been shading the truth, telling “little white lies,” to spare the person’s feelings. Even when the game is over, its lessons are not soon forgotten. Being honest with others doesn’t mean being brutal. It isn’t necessary to tell people everything you don’t like about them under the guise of being frank with them “for their own good.” Sometimes it’s better if we don’t know every person’s innermost feelings about us. Respect for another’s self-esteem often means telling them too little truth instead of too much.

Control your own mind, and you may never be controlled by the mind of another.

The mind is the most powerful weapon known to man. It simply cannot be controlled or contained by an outside force, however formidable that force may at first appear. Throughout history, tyrants have tried to control those who opposed them, but eventually these rulers discovered the power of the imagination was far greater than the threat of the sword. As Victor Hugo said, “An invasion of armies can be resisted, but not an idea whose time has come.”

You never know who your real friends are until adversity overtakes you and you need cooperation.

Everybody loves a winner, it has been said, but nobody knows you when you’re down and out. One of the often unappreciated benefits of adversity is that it accelerates the process of identifying your true friends. Most of us have many acquaintances and associates, but we are indeed fortunate if we have a handful of real friends. You will very quickly identify yours when you ask them for help. The wise individual is the one who, when asked for assistance, recognizes that he may one day find himself in the same situation. — Napoleon Hill

If you call on your friends only when you need something, you will soon find yourself without friends. #NapoleonHill

Napoleon Hill Quote of the Day
Napoleon Hill Quote of the Day

Napoleon Hill Quote of the Day

There is a great deal of wisdom in the old saw, “If you want friends, be a friend.” Friendship means giving without expecting anything in return. Busy, successful people are not searching for new friends. If you want to be their friend, you must make the effort to befriend them. Let them know that you are interested in them as people, not in what they can do for you, and you may find that you have made a true and loyal friend.

If you were your own employer, would you be entirely satisfied with the day’s work you have done today? #napoleonhill

Quote by Napoleon Hill. At the end of the day, it matters little what others think of you; what’s important is what you think about yourself. As you reflect on your day’s work, ask yourself, “Have I given 100 percent of my time and talents today? If this were my company, would I like it to be filled with hundreds of other people just like me, or would I prefer to hire individuals with a little more initiative?” When you have become the kind of person you would like to work with or have working for you, you aren’t far from the day when you will own the company — or at least become a valuable part of it. Most important, you can sleep soundly at night, serene in the knowledge that you have done your best, that you have earned your pay, and that you have met the standards of performance you require of yourself.

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